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Guide

5 Best Indoor Plants For Beginners

Indoor plants are a fantastic way to add a touch of nature to your home, improve air quality, and even boost your mood. However, as a beginner, it is challenging to know where to start. Here are our five favorite houseplants for beginners

With so many different plant varieties, choosing the right one is overwhelming. But don't worry! This article guides you through the best indoor plants for beginners. These plants are easy to care for, resilient, and will brighten your space. We'll also share tips on keeping your indoor plants healthy and thriving.

You don’t need a green thumb to find that perfect plant!

Which Features Should A Beginner Look For?

As a beginner, you should choose indoor plants that are easy to care for and thrive in the conditions of your home. Look for these key features when selecting indoor plants::

  • Choose plants that require minimal attention and tolerate periods of neglect. Plants like snake plants, Pothos, and spider plants are all low-maintenance options.

  • If you don't have access to a lot of natural light in your home, look for plants that cope with low-light conditions. For example, ZZ plants and peace lilies thrive in low-light areas.

  • If you have asthma or allergies, look for plants that are good at removing toxins from the air, which can improve indoor air quality. Plants like snake plants and peace lilies are known for their air-purifying properties.

  • Choose plants that are safe and non-toxic to cats and dogs, if you have pets. Some popular pet-friendly options include spider plants and ponytail palms.

  • Consider the size of the plant and the space where you plan to keep it. If space is limited, choose a smaller plant, like a succulent or a small cactus.

The Best Indoor Plant For Beginners

Many indoor plants are great for beginners. Here are some of the best options:

Snake Plant

This plant is a low-maintenance option that tolerates various lighting conditions. It's also known for its air-purifying properties.

Description

The snake plant, also known as Sansevieria and mother-in-law’s tongue, is a popular indoor plant native to Africa. It's a hardy, low-maintenance plant that adapts to different lighting conditions, making it an excellent choice for beginners.

The snake plant has tall, upright leaves that grow up to several feet tall, and they're often marked with variegated patterns of green and yellow. Some varieties have leaves that are a solid green color. The leaves are fleshy, thick and store water, meaning the plant survives for long periods without moisture.

Styling

Snake plants are versatile and used in many different ways. They can be planted in pots of various sizes and shapes: from small terracotta pots to large ceramic planters. They're also commonly used in modern, minimalist decor styles, as their sleek lines and sharp angles complement those aesthetics well. Snake plants are used as stand-alone plants or grouped together for added impact.

Why It’s Good for Beginners

Snake plants are extremely low-maintenance and tolerate low light, bright light, and everything in between. You only usually need to water them once every two to four weeks, although that does depend on the size of the pot and the amount of light they're receiving. They're also excellent air purifiers, removing toxins like formaldehyde and benzene from the air.

Pothos

Pothos is another easy-to-care-for plant that grows in low light and needs watering only once a week. If the humidity in your home is low, this tropical plant sometimes enjoys a light misting as well. It's perfect for hanging baskets or training to climb up a trellis or wall.

Description

Pothos, also known as devil's ivy, is a popular indoor plant that's native to the Solomon Islands. It's a fast-growing vine with long, trailing stems that reach up to 10 feet in length. The leaves are heart-shaped and are variegated with shades of green, yellow, and white, or they are a solid green color.

Some varieties to check out include golden Pothos or silver Ann Pothos.

One thing to note about Pothos is that they're toxic to pets if ingested, so if you have pets in your home, keep them out of reach.

Styling

Pothos are versatile and often grown in hanging baskets, allowing the vines to trail down and create a cascading effect. Pothos can also be trained to climb walls or wrap around trellises or moss poles.

Why It’s Good For Beginners

Pothos are great for beginners because they're so easy to care for. They tolerate a wide range of lighting conditions, from low light to bright, indirect light. They're also forgiving when it comes to watering, and they go several weeks without water. While they will wilt without regular water, they bounce back quickly when you give them a drink. Pothos plants are also known for purifying the air and removing toxins like formaldehyde and benzene.

ZZ Plant

The ZZ plant is a hardy, low-maintenance plant that thrives in low-light areas and only needs watering once every few weeks.

Description

The ZZ plant, also known as Zamioculcas zamiifolia, is a popular indoor plant native to eastern Africa. It's a hardy plant with thick, waxy leaves that grow up to three feet long. They are deep green and have a beautiful glossy sheen.

ZZ plants are toxic to pets if ingested.

Styling

In terms of styling, ZZ plants are great for adding texture to a room. They look great in modern or minimalist decor styles, as their sleek, shiny leaves add a touch of elegance to any space. You can plant ZZ plants in small pots for desktops and shelves or in larger pots as statement pieces in a room.

Why It’s Good For Beginners

ZZ plants are great for beginners because they're slow-growing and easy to care for. They tolerate low light and only you need to water them every few weeks. In fact, one of the most common ways to damage a ZZ plant is by overwatering as they’re susceptible to root rot. ZZ plants are also known for their air-purifying properties, removing toxins like xylene and toluene.

Peace Lily

This plant is a great air purifier and thrives in low-light conditions. It's also known for its beautiful white flowers.

Description

The peace lily, or Spathiphyllum, is a popular indoor plant that's native to tropical regions of the Americas and southeastern Asia. It's a hardy plant with glossy, dark green leaves and white flowers that resemble calla lilies.

Peace lilies are toxic to pets if ingested.

Styling

Peace lilies are great if you wish to add a touch of elegance to a room. They're often planted in floor pots or on pedestals, where their long, dark green leaves fan out and create a dramatic effect. Peace lilies are also used as tabletop plants or as part of a grouping with other plants to add visual interest.

Why It’s Good For Beginners

Peace lilies are great for beginners because they're very forgiving and easy to care for. They tolerate low light, and you don’t need to water them very often. In fact, overwatering harms the plant, so let the soil dry out before you water it again. Peace lilies are also great air purifiers, removing toxins like formaldehyde, benzene, and carbon monoxide from the air.

Spider Plant

Spider plants are easy to maintain and produce small white flowers in addition to their signature "spiderettes," or baby plants.

Description

The spider plant, also known as Chlorophytum comosum, is a popular indoor plant that's native to tropical and southern Africa. It's a fast-growing plant with long, thin leaves that are usually variegated with shades of green and white.

Styling

Spider plants can be used in many different ways. They look great in hanging baskets, where their long, thin leaves trail down and create a cascading effect. Spider plants are also planted in pots and used as tabletop plants or to add visual interest to bookshelves and other surfaces.

Why It's Good For Beginners

They tolerate low light to bright, indirect light and only require sporadic watering. Spider plants are also known for their air-purifying properties, removing toxins like formaldehyde and xylene from the air.

Another great feature of spider plants is that they produce "spiderettes," or small plantlets that you can easily propagate and grow into new plants.

Honorable Mentions

Philodendron - Large heart-shaped leaves bring a bold, tropical flair to your space. This fast-growing, easy houseplant can be trained to climb or styled in a basket as a hanging plant.

Aloe vera - Low-maintenance and drought-tolerant, with the added benefit of soothing sunburns!

Cast iron plant - The Aspidistra’s name comes from the fact that it’s virtually indestructible.

Jade plant - An easy care succulent that’s also said to bring good luck and prosperity to your home.

Ponytail palm - A slow-growing, drought-tolerant houseplant that requires very little care.

Chinese evergreen - An excellent air purifier with beautiful variegation, the Aglaonema houseplant will bounce back after a little neglect.

Dracaena - One of the easiest houseplants to grow, dracaenas come in several varieties with colors ranging from dark green, lime green, and even red.

High-Maintenance Plants

If you don’t trust your green thumb yet, stay clear of these high-maintenance plants until you have more experience or time to dedicate to plant care:

  • Alocasia

  • Bonsai tree

  • Boston fern

  • Fiddle leaf fig

  • Gardenia

  • Monstera

  • Orchid

  • Prayer plant

  • Stromanthe

  • Weeping fig

  • Zebra plant (Aphelandra)

Lighting And Watering Needs

When caring for your indoor plants, take a minute to consider their lighting and watering needs. Most indoor plants prefer bright indirect light, while others, like the cast iron plant and peace lily, tolerate low light conditions. Direct sun or direct sunlight harms some indoor plants, so choose a spot with the right lighting conditions for your plant.

In terms of your growing medium, always opt for a well-draining soil mix that won't hold too much water and cause root rot. Your pot should have drainage holes. Many beginners also choose self-watering pots so that plants can regulate their own water intake. Just don’t forget to refill the reservoir on a regular schedule!

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